Community Programs



Business Police Academy

Business Police Academy

Citizens Police Academy

Citizens Police Academy

C-TAP

C-TAP

Drug Abuse Resistance Education - DARE

Drug Abuse Resistance Education - DARE

Law Enforcement Explorers Program (LEEP)

Law Enforcement Explorers Program (LEEP)

Keiki Print & Keiki ID

Keiki Print & Keiki ID

Neighborhood Security Watch (NSW)

Neighborhood Security Watch (NSW)

Operation Identification Program

Operation Identification Program

Project C.L.E.A.N.

Project C.L.E.A.N.

Senior Safety Events / Aloha No Na Kupuna

Senior Safety Events / Aloha No Na Kupuna

Ride-Along Program

Ride-Along Program

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A police department interactive program that fosters "Understanding through Education". It is designed to educate the public about its departmental policies and operational procedures, the criminal justice system, and ways to reduce crime.

The BPA allows members of the department and citizens of Honolulu to meet, share ideas and information, and interact in a very positive and proactive setting. Graduates will not emerge as trained police officers but as better informed citizens who will be able to share their education and experiences with family, friends, and coworkers



How can I attend the BPA?

Applications can be obtained by contacting the Honolulu Police Department, Criminal Investigation Division at (808)723-3609 or the Community Affairs Division at (808)723-3475, or download an application.



What type of information will be presented?

Presentation topics will include the criminal justice system, credit card fraud, forgery and check fraud, identity theft and Internet crimes, auto theft and ACID etching, crime prevention through environmental design, shoplifting and employee theft, workplace violence, etc.



Who will attend?

The BPA will be made up of members from the private and public businesses of our community. Members must be at least 21 years of age and maintain a good standing in our community.



When and where?

Participants will meet 3-4 hours a week for eight weeks. The sessions will be held at the Honolulu Police Department's Alapa`i Headquarters.

The Citizens Police Academy (CPA) began in Honolulu in 1994. The Citizens Police Academy is an interactive program, designed to educate the public about the Honolulu Police Department (HPD), Its policies and operational procedures, the criminal justice system, and ways to reduce crime.

The CPA allows members of the HPD and citizens of the City and County of Honolulu to meet, share ideas and information, and interact in a very positive and proactive setting.

12 weeks of courses designed to familiarize participants with the many different aspects of police work. Participants who graduate the CPA will be better-informed citizens who will be able to share their education and experiences with family, friends, and co-workers.

Graduates of the CPA represent a diverse cross section of our community. Personnel from the Department of Education, businesspersons, retired persons, media personnel, government representatives, community officials as well as the general public have attended CPA.

If you would like more on the CPA contact the Community Affairs Division at (808)723-3475.

The Community-Traffic Awareness Partnership (C-TAP) is an organized sign-waving event that sends the message to motorists that neither the police nor the community will tolerate unnecessary traffic injuries.

Contact your district Community Policing Team to find out how you can have an event in your area.

The D.A.R.E. program was developed in 1983 as a cooperative effort by the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles Unified School District, to teach children how to resist peer pressure and live productive, drug- and violence-free lives.

Employing a formal, semester-long curriculum, and using well-trained, uniformed police officers to teach in the classrooms, D.A.R.E. focuses special attention on students who are in their last years of elementary school, who are not yet likely to be led by their peers to experiment with alcohol, tobacco, and drugs and therefore more receptive to prevention education.

HPD brought the D.A.R.E. program to the island of Oahu in 1985. The pilot program began in four elementary schools. Over the years, the teaching methods and curriculum have been updated. Curriculum that were added to the program addressed issues such as bullying, internet safety, and over-the-counter drugs. The information, principles, and skills taught through activities within the lessons help to build the students' abilities to solve difficult personal and social problems related to substance use and abuse. This enables students to make decisions that are informed and in their best interest.

The LEEP involves children between the ages of 14 and 18. The program is under the direction of the Boy Scouts of America and gives youngsters an opportunity to explore law enforcement as a career.

Recruitment begins when school starts in August.

District 1 (Downtown Honolulu), District 3 (Pearl City/Waipahu), and District 8 (Kapolei/Waianae coast) participate in the program.

LEEP is recognized as a school club and has a school advisor.

The explorers receive basic training in October and advanced training in March.

The explorers perform valuable community service projects for both the public and private sectors. The participants gain insight in law enforcement as a career in a way that is not readily available to the public. The program currently involves about 50 students and is hoping to expand to the other police districts.

Safeguarding our keiki

Over 800,000 children in the United States are reported missing each year.

If a child is missing, time is crucial, the availibility of up-to-date information becomes a valuable tool.

The police and FBI recommend that parents and guardians keep a current record of ID information, fingerprints, and a DNA sample of their children. This information may be vital if a child is lost or abducted.

The Honolulu Police Department is associated with two programs that assist parents and guardians with gathering and safekeeping keiki information.

Keiki Print

The Honolulu Police Department's Keiki Print Program provides parents and guardians with a convenient way to collect information on a card that can be kept in a safe location.

The parents or guardians fill-in the child's information, attach a current photo, and a few strands of hair.

HPD officers will have ink pads available to assist with obtaining fingerprints and will also provide other suggestions to help safeguard keiki.

Information should be updated annually.

Keiki ID

Created in 1996, the "Keiki ID" program is a community service provided by Chevron Hawaii in partnership with the Honolulu Police Department.

Parents or guardians provide addresses, phone number, and physician information to be included on the card. HPD officers assist with adding a photo, and helping with thumbprints.

The "Keiki ID" is laminated and cannot be readily updated.

The "Keiki ID" is not an official government record and should remain with parents and guardians.

Where to get a Keiki Print Card

The Honolulu Police Department conducts the Keiki Print & Keiki ID at various events without cost to the public.

To request the keiki print presentation go to our request page, or call the Community Affairs Division for upcoming events.

The Neighborhood Security Watch (NSW) program on Oahu is sponsored by the Honolulu Police Department.

Community participation -- Neighborhood Watch Groups

The NSW program involves community participation and involvement in a self-help cooperative battle against crime. Crime can create a climate of fear and mistrust. One of the most effective and least costly remedies to crime is a neighborhood watch group. Watch groups are a foundation of community crime prevention.

Goals

The overall goals of the Neighborhood Security Watch are:


To increase public education concerning local problems and effective preventive measures which lead to improved residential security;

To implement community based and coordinated programs that are designed to increase the level of community awareness and mutual concern for the protection of homes within a given community; and,

To enhance community and police relations.

The Honolulu Police Department conducts the Operation Identification Program as a service to the citizens of Honolulu. This program helps to take the profit out of burglaries and other thefts by making the stolen property easier to identify and harder to sell.

Burglars and other thieves thrive on stolen property which can be easily sold because it cannot be properly identified. Recovered property that lacks personalized identification cannot be traced and returned to the owner, and it is difficult to introduce as evidence.

Use an electric engraver to mark your favorite numbers, dates, or initials on all of your valuable property including guns, radios, cameras, tape recorders, tape decks, kitchen appliances, tools, lawn mowers, and stereos -- anything you feel has a value.

How can you participate in this program? It's as simple as engraving favorite numbers, dates, or initials on your valuable property and making an inventory list. Then you place the provided decals in conspicuous areas to let any would-be prowlers in your neighborhood know that you have marked your valuables and are a participant in Operation Identification.

This program greatly increase the risk criminals must take to steal your property.

Markable property

Engrave your number in a place where it can be observed easily. Make your number as large as possible, and paint over the grooves you make with fingernail polish or correction fluid to make the markings more visible.

Engravers may be borrowed from the Honolulu Police Department's Community Affairs Division.

Unmarkable property

If the property is unmarkable, such as antiques, jewelry, silver, artwork, etc., you should photograph or videotape it.

Inventorying

When inventorying and marking property, use a systematic approach. Take one room at a time. As the property is marked or photographed, enter it on your inventory list.

A detailed inventory list will aid you, your insurance company, and the Police Department in establishing your losses and recovering your property. The inventory is yours to keep. DO NOT send a copy to the Police Department when you have been victimized. Make several copies of the completed inventory list and keep them in a safe place.

Identification of stolen property

If your engraved valuables are stolen you have a better chance of recovering them. When an officer locates suspected stolen property a computer check of the identification number is made. Items marked with the Operation I.D. Program help to locate the owner who will be immediately notified.

Suggested inventory list

You can create your own list, obtain an inventory form from our Community Affairs Section. Keep your list of your personal property in a safe place. Print this FORM.

Operation ID decals

After the marking has been completed, contact the Community Affairs Division of the Honolulu Police Department to obtain Operation I.D. decals.
Place the decals in conspicuous areas, visible to any would-be prowlers in your neighborhood.

Project C.L.E.A.N. is an initiative created by Chief Louis Kealoha that brings community organizations together to enrich neighborhoods by painting out graffiti, removing trash and bulky items, and building partnerships.

Every year an estimated 2.1 million older Americans are victims of physical, psychological, or other forms of abuse and neglect. As alarming as it sounds, this statistic may not tell the whole story. For every case of elder abuse and neglect that is reported, experts estimate that there may be as many as five unreported cases. Not surprisingly, recent studies suggest that elders who have been abused tend to die earlier than those who are not abused, even in the absence of chronic conditions or life threatening disease.

The purpose of Aloha No Na Kupuna

Aloha No Na Kupuna promotes senior safety and celebrates the spirit of giving in the lives of seniors who have been affected by or are at risk of abuse, neglect, or financial hardship. The program is designed to bring together valuable resources from throughout the community and provide our senior citizens safety and crime prevention information. Aloha No Na Kupuna reflects the generous spirit of all those who contribute to this event as well as the gentle, caring spirit of those we serve and protect with Aloha.

Events

At these events, the education of our senior citizens is the main concern. Many safety presentations are given to all attendees including pedestrian safety, identity theft, and personal safety. The Community Policing Teams also provide Kupuna ID card. These cards contain the senior's personal information along with his or her photograph and keep seniors safe in the event of an emergency.

The purpose of the HPD Ride-Along Program

To promote and improve mutual understanding of police and community problems;
To improve the image of the police in the community and develop an awareness of the respect for law and order;
To develop enthusiasm for a career in law enforcement.

Who is eligible to participate?

Visiting law enforcement officials.
Government officials as related to their official duties.
College students as arranged for classroom credit programs.
Civilian employees of the Honolulu Police Department.
Certified Police Explorer Scouts
Persons with an interest in a career in law enforcement as referred by school and career counselors.
Families and friends of police officers to ride with that particular officer.
Members of the news media.
Others at the discretion of the commander of the Community Affairs Section or the district patrol commander.

Adult ride-along requirements

Must be 18 year of age or older.
Each ride must be authorized by the Community Affairs Section commander or a designee, or by the district patrol commander.
Adult must fill out the Adult Waiver - Authorization/Medical/Injury form and have it approved.
The Permit to Ride/Emergency Information form must be in the participant's possession at all times during the ride.

Youth ride-along requirements

Must be age 12 through 17 to participate.
The parent(s) or guardian(s) of interested youths must sign the Parental Consent - Authorization/Medical/Injury form and have the signature witnessed by a police officer.
The Permit to Ride (Minors)/Emergency Information form must be approved and signed.

Limitations and responsibilities

All participants are limited to one ride per calendar year.
Hours of operation are normally 6 PM to 10PM. Rides are limited to 4 hours.
Male riders ride with male officers and females with female officers
Riders will make arrangements with the district at least two days in advance of the desired ride-along date.
Must be properly attired and wearing shoes (no slippers).

Request Procedures

Each individual requesting to ride along is required to read and sign the instructions for participants form prior to the ride. You can print the ride along forms, complete it, and bring it with you, along with a picture identification card (i.e. drivers license or law enforcement identification card) when you come to the police station. These completed forms are required before a ride-along can be approved. A background check will be conducted. Each ride must be authorized by the Community Affairs Division commander or a designee.

All forms are required to be filled out prior to a ride-along. A routine background check is conducted for all participants in the ride-along program.

To help speed up the process, the forms may be printed and filled out. The completed forms, a long with a copy of a picture identification card (i.e. Drivers license or law enforcement identification card) may be mailed to:

Honolulu Police Department
Community Affairs Division
801 S. Beretania Street
Honolulu, HI 96813


HPD offers the following Community Programs:

 

Business Police Academy - designed to educate the public about its departmental policies and operational procedures, the criminal justice system, and ways to reduce crime. 


Citizen's Police Acedemy - 12 weeks of courses designed to familiarize participants with the many different aspects of police work.


C-TAP - an organized sign-waving event that sends the message to motorists that neither the police nor the community will tolerate unnecessary traffic injuries.


D.A.R.E. - teaches children how to resist peer pressure and live productive, drug and violence free lives.


Explorers (LEEP) -  gives children ages 14 to 21 an opportunity to explore law enforcement as a career.



Keiki Print - helps parents and guardians collect and save information on their children. This information may be vital if a child is lost or abducted.

 

Neighborhood Watch - involves community participation and involvement in a self-help cooperative battle against crime.


Operation ID - helps to take the profit out of burglaries and other thefts by making the stolen property easier to identify and harder to sell. 



P.A.L. - developing and maintaining various sports activities for children.

 

Project Clean - brings community organizations together to enrich neighborhoods by painting out graffiti, removing trash and bulky items, and building partnerships.



Senior Safety Events - the education of our senior citizens is the main concern through  safety presentations.


Ride-Along Program- to promote and improve mutual understanding of police and community problems.


COMMUNITY POLICING


Community Policing



Speaker, Tour



Resources


Community Programs


Ride-Along Forms