Hall of Fame


Hall of Fame



Chief Daniel S.C. Liu

Chief Daniel S.C. Liu

Chief Francis A. Keala

Chief Francis A. Keala

Sergeant Edwin I. Adolphson, Jr.

Sergeant Edwin I. Adolphson, Jr.

Sister Roberta Julie Derby

Sister Roberta Julie Derby

Detective Chang Apana

Detective Chang Apana

Reserve Officer Ladislaus "Roger" Piwowarski

Reserve Officer Ladislaus

Detective John J. Jardine

Detective John J. Jardine

Detective Lucile M. Abreu

Detective Lucile M. Abreu

Captain John A. Burns

Captain John A. Burns

Assistant Chief Barbara U. Wong

Assistant Chief Barbara U. Wong

Officer Kam Fong Chun

Officer Kam Fong Chun

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Served from June 1, 1932 to July 1, 1969


Dan Liu was the Honolulu Police Department's fourth police chief and the longest serving chief. He led the department from 1948 to 1969. He is also the first American police chief of Chinese descent.


As chief, he instituted strong enforcement programs; obtained better salaries, benefits, and working conditions for employees; and improved the training of officers. Many of the changes instituted during his tenure are still in place, such as the redesign of the police badge, change from the original olive drab-colored uniform to navy blue, and the establishment of a chaplaincy corps, a canine corps, and the Police Activities League. He was the first police official from Hawaii to be elected president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the largest organization of police executives in the world. Under his leadership, the department gained national prominence.


The Downtown Chinatown Substation was named in his honor in 1990.


Inducted on May 17, 2007

Served from April 16, 1956 to April 1, 1983


Francis Keala was the fifth and youngest police chief in the history of The Honolulu's Police Department. He was sworn in as Chief at the age of 39 and led the department from 1969 to 1983.


Chief Keala's term began during the tumultuous era of antiwar demonstration and the civil rights movement. In what was then considered a bold move, he informed the public that organized crime had become well established in the community and led the department to disrupt its operations. He also focused on some of the more common crimes and used innovative and elaborate tactics to fight the problem, including the "Operation Hukilau" undercover sting enterprise, "Operation Green Harvest" marijuana eradication program, a school truancy program, and a "no questions asked" firearms turn-in campaign.


Chief Keala is also credited with expanding Internal Affairs to include annual inspections, developing a recruitment drive and a training program that received national recognition, and creating a community relations division to get the public involved with combating crime.


Inducted on May 17, 2007

Served from September 1, 1939 to May 31, 1966



Edwin "Buddy" Adolphson is considered to be one of the most honored police officers in the United States. During his career with the Honolulu Police Department, he was the only one assigned to the Safety Patrol and is credited with saving the lives of more than 100 people including swimmers, surfers, and hikers. His patrol vehicle was outfitted with ocean and mountain rescue equipment in addition to his regular police gear.



Throughout his career, Sergeant Adolphson received many local, national, and international awards and commendations. He is the first Honolulu police officer to receive the department's flag for outstanding heroism.



Inducted on May 17, 2007

Served from November 4, 1976 to April 8, 1996


Sister Roberta Julie Derby was the first female police chaplain in the United States and the only chaplain to receive the Honolulu Police Department's (HPD) Warrior Silver Medal of Valor. While at the HPD, she counseled hundreds of employees and their families.


Sister Roberta's association with the HPD began in 1971 when she taught classes to police officers attending Chaminade University. Five years later, she joined the police department as a volunteer chaplain and earned the nickname "Chaplain One." She was awarded the silver medal in 1980 for defusing a hostage situation involving an armed man who was threatening to kill his son.


Sister Roberta was appointed to the full-time position of Police Counselor/Chaplain Coordinator in 1989 and held this title until her death.


The park adjacent to the HPD headquarters was named in her honor in 1999.


Inducted on May 17, 2007

Served from 1898 to 1932


Chang Apana's legendary career as a police officer in Honolulu began in 1898. Although he was small in stature, only 5 feet tall, he was bigger than life. He was the only officer allowed to carry a bullwhip instead of a gun. Chief William Gabrielson credited Detective Apana's ability to solve many cases to his fluency in Hawaiian and Cantonese, his wide network of informants, and his shrewd and meticulous detective style. During his career, he was stabbed six times, thrown out a second-story window; and run over with a horse and buggy. Each time, Detective Apana managed to apprehend his suspect.


His exploits attracted the attention of novelist, Earl Derr Biggers, who is said to have created the character "Charlie Chan" after Detective Apana.


Inducted on May 15, 2008

Served from November 21, 1950 to March 31, 2002


Roger Piwowarski is the longest serving reserve officer in the history of the Honolulu Police Department (HPD). His career began in 1950 while employed full-time at the Matson Navigation Company. He volunteered his time to serve as a police officer for more than 50 years, working in nearly every element in the department, including 23 years in patrol. Reserve Officer Piwowarski's first assignment was in the Waikiki district where he worked 12-hour shifts, 3 days a week. At that time, reserve officers were required to purchase and maintain their own vehicles, uniforms, firearms and equipment, including sirens.


In 1981, Reserve Officer Piwowarski was assigned to the Juvenile Services Division where he helped to start the Friday night counseling program for young first-time misdemeanor offenders. He was named the Honolulu Police Department's Reserve Officer of the Year twice, the first time in 1990 and the second time in 2000. After his retirement from the reserve officer program in 2002, he continued to volunteer his time at the HPD until his death in October 2003.


Inducted on May 15, 2008

Served from July 16, 1923 to December 29, 1968


John Jardine was 21-years-old when he joined the Honolulu Police Department on July 16, 1923. He was promoted to the rank of detective 18 months later and established himself as smart and softhearted but a tenacious enemy of the underworld. He investigated and solved many murder, robbery, public corruption, theft, and forgery cases. Detective Jardine was one of the investigators in the infamous Massie case in which U.S. Navy Lieutenant Thomas Massie and his mother-in-law were convicted of murdering one of his wife's alleged rapists in 1931.


After 12 years with the Honolulu Police Department, Detective Jardine was transferred to the City Prosecutor's Officer as a Special Investigator where he retired on December 29, 1968. Detective Jardine's sustained superior performance throughout his career, his integrity and dedication to his job, and his outstanding character earned him the respect of his peers and the community.


Inducted on May 16, 2009

Served from September 9, 1953 to December 29, 1978


All Honolulu Police Departments female officers and male officers under 5'8" in height owe their careers to Lucile Abreu.


Lucile Abreu joined the department at a time when female officers were given a lower civil service rank from the male officers and were assigned to Juvenile Crime Prevention Division with no possibility of promotion. After she passed the sergeant's exam but was denied promotion on several occasions, the 5'2" mother of five, filed a federal lawsuit, challenging the system. This led the way for equal rights for all police officers and the elimination of a minimum height requirement. In 1975, Abreu was promoted to the rank of detective and became the first woman assigned to the Criminal Investigation Division.


Detective Abreu forever changed the face of the Honolulu Police Department.


Inducted on May 15, 2010

Served from April 1, 1934 to August 18, 1945


John Burns's role in the Honolulu Police Department's (HPD) history went far beyond fighting crime in the streets. The highlight of his police career was his fight for civil rights.


John Anthony Burns joined the HPD during its early years when the department's focus was on hiring better-educated personnel. After working in patrol and the Vice Division, Burns was handpicked by Chief William Gabrielson in December 1940 to head the department's new Espionage Bureau. Burns was assigned to work with the Federal Bureau of Investigation to look into rumors of sabotage and disloyalty against the United States, primarily by people of Japanese ancestry. None of the reports were proven true.


After the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, Burns fought the wholesale internment of individuals based on their ethnicity. He also advised the local Japanese community on how they might serve the U.S. during wartime, including recruiting men to enlist in the 100th Battalion and 442nd Regimental Combat Team.


Burns's involvement with the Japanese community and the defense of their civil rights later helped to establish support for the Hawaii Democratic Party and his pursuit of public office.


Burns resigned from the HPD in 1945. He was elected as a territorial delegate to Congress in 1956 and served as Governor from 1962 to 1974.


Inducted on May 21, 2011

Served from January 16, 1975 to June 20, 2000


Barbara Wong paved the way for female officers in the Honolulu Police Department (HPD) by becoming one of the first female commissioned police officers in the HPD. She earned the respect of fellow officers by being a role model, supervisor, commander, and bureau chief.


She joined the HPD in 1972 as a police radio dispatcher. In 1974, the HPD opened the officer position to females, and she became one of the first two females hired to perform the same patrol duties as a male officer. This landmark was reflected in the HPD badge designation change from "Patrolman" to "Officer." Barbara Wong was received with mixed emotions by her follow officers. Despite the challenges, she earned the respect of those who worked with her through her dedication, integrity, and compassion.


In February 1997, she became the department's first female Assistant Chief and headed the Central Patrol Bureau and later Administrative Bureau. Assistant Chief Barbara Wong retired from the HPD on June 20, 2000. Upon her retirement, she went on to fulfill her lifelong dream of attending law school. She earned her Juris Doctorate in 2003 from the William S. Richardson School of Law, graduating Magna Cum Laude. She was admitted to the Hawaii State Bar Association that year. In 2005, Barbara Wong was appointed as the Executive Director of the State Campaign Spending Commission, the first female to hold that position.


Inducted on May 9, 2012

Served from July 26, 1944 to November 30, 1959


Best known for his recurring role as Detective Chin Ho Kelly on the popular TV show, Hawaii Five-O, Kam Fong Chun overcame great personal hardship and family tragedy to ultimately attain success as a husband, father, police officer, businessman, and actor. His legacy of determination, resilience, and hard work is an inspiration to many.


Chun was born in Kalihi in 1918. His parents divorced when he was young and Chun's mother struggled to raise several children. After graduating from President William McKinley High School in 1938, he worked at the Pearl Harbor Shipyard as a boilermaker. Chun was at work on December 7, 1941, when Japanese fighter planes attacked the harbor and thrust America into World War II. Chun survived the attack, but tragically lost his wife Esther and their two young children three years later when a pair of B-24 bomber planes crashed into the family's home.


Less than two months later, Chun joined the Honolulu Police Department. He married his wife Gladys in 1949, and together they had four children. Chun worked as one of Honolulu's Finest for 16 years, in assignments that included patrol officer, radio dispatcher, and working with junior police officers (JPO). He retired from the Honolulu Police Department in 1960 to pursue outside interests, including a career in acting. Chun appeared in several local plays and Hollywood movies before catapulting to fame on Hawaii Five-O as the low-key, trustworthy Detective Chin Ho Kelly. During his 10 years on the show, Chun always strove to promote a positive image of Hawaii law enforcement and was a role model for many local youths.


Inducted on May 18, 2013



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